Fifty Shades: William Giraldi / Jennifer Hamady / Lily Zheng

A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned that I was working on an article about quality sexual literature.

The article is titled Beyond the Hype of Fifty Shades of Grey, and can be viewed in full at the OpEdNews website:

http://www.opednews.com/articles/Beyond-the-Hype-of-Fifty-S-by-Jess-C-Scott-Books_Culture_Sex_Sex-140814-381.html

The article features the expert opinions of ten professionals in the fields of academia, psychology, and media communications, who comment on the cultural implications of the series and share their recommendations for quality sexual literature.

I received some VERY lengthy and passionate responses, which I have compiled here on my blog, divided into three different posts. I could only feature excerpts in the above article, due to space constraints. Here are the full responses of the first three guest contributors!

P.S. Check out Part 2 and Part 3 for the full replies of the other guests.

* * *

1. William Giraldi, professor at Boston University and Fiction Editor for AGNI:

William-Giraldis-Bunker

William Giraldi | Image from TinHouse

I’m not certain that men and women deserve better than Fifty Shades of Grey. Emerson once quipped that “people do not deserve good writing, they are so pleased with bad.” And I rarely disagree with Mr. Emerson. I’d tell men and women to put down these books because they are bad for their health, but people never listen to advice about their health.

Quality sexual literature can be found among the poems of Sappho and Catullus, in the satires of De Sade, and in the novels of Nicholson Baker. The Story of O and Venus in Furs are not masterpieces but they have some psychological depth and the prose isn’t toxic. I’d caution that the best sexual literature knows what to leave to the imaginative and what not.

2. Jennifer Hamady, voice coach, psychotherapist, and online columnist at Psychology Today:

jennifer-hamady

Jennifer Hamady

Thinking aloud, I don’t think the question is necessarily about whether people deserve better than Fifty Shades of Grey. In general I think wrong vs. right arguments aren’t the most helpful. Rather, I’d say that in our culture, which isn’t entirely open about and comfortable with sex, a book like Fifty Shades — or any book — can tend to have a more powerful influence than it might in a healthier context. I will say that the more violent aspects of the book concern me because — again — our current cultural context does not hold women on an equal footing to men (watch any music video if you need evidence). Whether or not it is intentional, the book therefore can be seen as agreeing with the idea that violence against and the subjugation of women is sexy, and even necessary for young women who want to be in relationships.

3. Lily Zheng, president of Kardinal Kink, an advocacy and support group for the kink community at Stanford University:

Stock Image from Dreamstime

(1) On whether men and women deserve better than Fifty Shades of Grey:

Fifty Shades of Grey enjoyed so much success because it talked, frankly and explicitly, about the type of sexual and sensual encounters that our society idealizes but outwardly condemns. In the existing social landscape of almost Puritan-esque opinions on sex and intimacy (sex is something that, if enjoyed at all, can only be enjoyed a certain way) the existence of Fifty Shades was disruptive and subversive in many ways. Not only the book itself, but the surprising number of men and women (women, mostly) who purchased it indicated that the book was fantasy, a fantasy that resonated especially well with its fans.

Erotic literature is necessary because it fulfills desires; erotic literature is necessary because it helps create a culture in which the sensual is more normal, in which physical intimacy is as much a diverse and varied staple as emotional intimacy.

And that precise reason is why Fifty Shades isn’t good enough.

Fifty Shades of Grey is ultimately a tale of nonconsent. As the relationships between characters develop, nonconsent becomes increasingly stamped across interaction after interaction. There is no negotiating of scenes, no establishing of hard and soft limits, not even a facsimile of the consent rituals and focus on safety that the real life kink and BDSM scenes feature. Fifty Shades of Grey isn’t a story that could or should happen in real life. Fifty Shades is fantasy.

To some extent, that’s okay. It’s perfectly fine for fantastical or improbable tales to exist, and many are excellent in their own right. It becomes a problem, however, when people begin to mistake fantasy for reality. People read erotica to experience it. We seek the sensual because we project ourselves into the stories we read, and envision ourselves — tied up, gagged, begging for release, our bodies burning like firebrands — through the lens of the words on the page.

We deserve erotic literature. We deserve good erotic literature. We deserve realistic erotic literature. Argue all you want the Fifty Shades is “good,” but it’s unmistakably unrealistic. Worse still, most people who read it don’t know that.

Most people who read Fifty Shades find themselves fantasizing about or imagining the nonconsensual, dangerous interactions as legitimate, as positive, as desirable. Almost every young adult (and their mother, apparently) knows the general plot of the novel.

“It’s kinky BDSM stuff, right?”

But Fifty Shades is to kink as rape is to sex; they may both look the same on the outside but the differences are fundamental, substantial, and potentially dangerous.

The inaccurate and fanciful depiction of kink in Fifty Shades of Grey hurts both the existing kink and leather communities and nonkinky people alike. The wrong type of kink is normalized by this book, and whether or not we fancy ourselves purveyors of good literature, we deserve to read better novels.

(2) On quality sexual literature:

Quality sexual literature can be enjoyed in more than one way. Quality sexual literature engages with the reader aesthetically — the prose flows well, the flow is dynamic, the descriptions are vivid in lush, practical and concise exactly where they need to be — and viscerally — the writing evokes a physical or bodily reaction from the reader, whether that reaction be sexual, sensual, or emotional. However, the best sexual literature is these two things and more: the best sexual literature is relatable.

There is a difference between imagining the abstract notion of “bondage” and being able to conceptualize the excited negotiation, the handpicking of rope, the vocalizing of desires and fears all laid out bare on the bed long before any clothing comes off. There is a difference between imagining rope on your body and understanding the meaning of the tightness on your skin, the significance behind the vulnerability, the worth of that “yes, sir!” or “yes, mistress!”

Owning Regina, a novel by Lorelei Elstrom written in diary format, is a story about kink that meets that bar. Unlike Fifty Shades of Grey, there is no magic telepathy between people, no porno-levels of endurance, no “perfect” interactions or scenes, no encouraged nonconsent. Rather, this book displays kink as it is in real life: consensual, communicative, and imperfect, a dance between people.

The realism in this novel is impressive. The conflict feels real and pressing; the characters are deep, well-developed, and likeable, and most importantly, the writing tingles with that uncertain excitement that I can most accurately describe as the moment before knocking on the door of partner’s house. This is a diary — it’s not hardcore erotica, but it’s not a documentary either. It’s gritty, dirty, raw, and satisfying in a way that neither of the two are on their own.

I recommend this book because it isn’t fantasy kink. The triumphs the characters exult in are triumphs many practitioners of BDSM and kink, veterans and casual play partners alike, experience. The conflicts are conflicts everyone who has experienced kink with a partner must go through.

Kinky literature tends to be marketed towards those who have never experienced kink, with most people in actual kink communities scorning that brand of erotic literature. For that reason, when kinky literature succeeds with both kinky and nonkinky people alike, it is especially important to acknowledge and understand why.

Owning Regina is one of those few novels I have found that manage to meet the bar I have set for kinky literature.


Fifty Shades: Lonnie Barbach / Tania De Rozario / Avital Norman Nathman / Russell J Stambaugh

My article Beyond the Hype of Fifty Shades of Grey features the expert opinions of ten professionals who comment on the cultural implications of the series, and share their recommendations for quality sexual literature.

I received some VERY lengthy and passionate responses, which I have compiled here on my blog, divided into three different posts. I could only feature excerpts in the above article, due to space constraints. Here are the full responses of the guest contributors #4-7!

P.S. Check out Part 1 and Part 3 for the full replies of the other guests.

* * *

4. Lonnie Barbach, couple’s therapist and intimacy expert:

lonnie_barbach

Lonnie’s entire response is included in the article, so here is a short bio instead:

Dr Barbach’s work as a couple’s therapist for more than three decades and the publication of Going the Distance: Finding and Keeping Lifelong Love crafted with David Geisinger, Ph.D., her partner of 25 years, has defined her as an acknowledged expert on intimate relationships.

Dr Barbach has appeared on hundreds of local radio and television programs as well as most nationally televised talk shows, many several times, including Oprah, Good Morning America, The Today Show, CBS Morning News, and Charlie Rose.

In 2012, her first book, For Yourself: the fulfillment of female sexuality was recently ranked the #1 self-help book across all surveys carried out by the National Register of Health Care Providers in Psychology, the major credentialing organization for psychologists.  For Each Other: sharing sexual intimacy was ranked #4.

5. Tania De Rozario, award-winning writer on issues of gender and sexuality:

TaniaDeRozario

Well, I had the misfortune of hearing some excerpts from [Fifty Shades] before I got a chance to read it…and they put me of it forever. There’s good sex and then there’s bad writing.

I think there’s a lot of good writing to be found off the internet, actually. But you’ve got to sift through a fair bit of stuff to find it. And it’s usually from unknown authors :)

6. Avital Norman Nathman, a writer, advocate, and contract employee with the Yale School of Public Health:

avital

I’m happy to lend a few thoughts. I think women in particular deserve better in general. There’s a general sense that women readers will accept and enjoy sub-par quality, especially when it comes to erotic writing, and that’s simply not fair. There’s definitely an art and skill to writing in that genre and why shouldn’t folks receive the best, especially when they’re paying for it? Fifty Shades is an interesting case because it had a built in fanbase before it was even a published book. I think a lot of its popularity grew from the tight-knit community of  fanfiction readers that were there from it’s conception (as a Twilight fanfiction called Master of the Universe). And while the concept of the story is interesting, the execution could have been stronger. The good news is — there’s a ton of great erotica out there just wait to be read!

Instead of recommending just one book, I’m happy to point you to this roundtable I facilitated that offers some great suggestions!

Part 1: http://www.thefrisky.com/2013-08-27/real-talk-on-literary-erotica-part-1
Part 2: http://www.thefrisky.com/2013-08-29/real-talk-on-literary-erotica-part-2

7. Russell J Stambaugh, clinical psychologist and chairman of the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists (AASECT) AltSex Special Interest Group:

russell_stambaugh

The Fifty Shades series is genre fiction. As such, the conventions of the genre have trumped realistic representation and good sex education at many points. While the vast majority of readers have not taken the novels as a call to action, either to try kink at home, or to seek out kink organizations where quality education about BDSM can be found, such organizations have seen a spike of interest attributable to the book series.

Market theory says people automatically get the entertainment they deserve. Aesthetic theory suggests mostly that they deserve better. Certainly, experienced denizens who enjoy BDSM lifestyles and sex play have created lots of critical discourse about how Grey and Steele are depicted, and problems with their communication. They think BDSM deserves better depiction.

But when you get down to it;  when genuine BDSM lifestyle practitioners describe the erotica they like, it doesn’t meet very high standards of Safe, Sane and Consensual practice, nor Risk-Aware Consensual Kink standards either.  Here are some things they liked:

The Story of O is very popular.  For years no one knew who Pauline Reage was.  Eventually she was revealed to be a writer/editor Anne Desclos at a European publishing house who wrote it for her male paramour on a dare.  He had made the rather French and arrogant claim that no woman could write decent erotica, so she wrote it somewhat to his tastes.  When the novel became a serious commercial success, their private debate was taken up by the critics, many of whom, thoroughly embedded in pre-feminist sensibilities, refused to believe that the author behind the pseudonym was actually a woman. It is by no means a catalogue of best kink practices.  Still, untold numbers of submissives have dreamed of an extended stay at Roissy, SSC or not!

Venus in Furs was Leoplod von Sacher-Masoch’s then scandalous novella of female dominance that so impressed physician Richard von Krafft-Ebing that he gave Masoch’s name to his new clinical syndrome sexual masochism.  Masoch’s early training as a lawyer and his active fantasy life led him to invent the first masochistic contract.  This is a cornerstone of play in Sacher-Masoch’s real life adventures, his book, and in Fifty Shades.  Christian administers the contracting process a great deal more like an End-User Licensing Agreement than a real kinkster would, perhaps because he’s a technology magnate.  More likely, however, it is because James couldn’t imagine keeping the contracting process sexy and foreshortened it to get to the good stuff.

The works of the Marquis de Sade are  probably better consumed as radical critical theory about personal freedom than as erotica.  It is easy to see how The Divine Marquis, imprisoned for genuine violence against women under l’Ancien Regime, then freed by the French Revolution got himself re-imprisoned for criticizing the Directorate for using the guillotine to dispatch opponents for purely abstract and political reasons, rather than proper passion.

Reading de Sade literally and then acting on his advice is an effective recipe for incarceration today.  His relentlessly transgressive vibe and explicit depictions still make de Sade a popular pornographer.

Excellent scene writers like Pat Califia, or Laura Antonieu have written much-admired works like Macho Sluts and The Marketplace that BDSMers find genuinely hot.  Calfia’s work has the special strength of crossing gender boundaries, an importsnt dimension of life in many BDSM communities that are not reflected in Fifty Shades.  For extra-credit, do not write Laura asking for the actual geo-location of The Marketplace.  She already gets plenty of such requests.

Finally, I would personally recommend the work of Mary Gaitskill, particularly Bad Behavior, a collection of short stories and Two Girls: Fat and Thin.  Gaitskill writes with economy, precision and feeling about outsiders and their sexuality.  By most, she will be read as serious fiction rather than erotica.  Bad Behavior contains ‘The Secretary,’ from which the screenplay for the Maggie Gyllenhaal and James Spader movie (2002) was adapted.


Fifty Shades: Russ Linton / Cliff Burns / Nick Shamhart

My article Beyond the Hype of Fifty Shades of Grey features the expert opinions of ten professionals who comment on the cultural implications of the series, and share their recommendations for quality sexual literature.

I received some VERY lengthy and passionate responses, which I have compiled here on my blog, divided into three different posts. I could only feature excerpts in the above article, due to space constraints. Here are the full responses of the guest contributors #8-10!

P.S. Check out Part 1 and Part 2 for the full replies of the other guests.

* * *

8. Russ Linton, speculative fiction writer and former FBI Investigative Specialist:

russ_linton

Hi Jess: Glad to have inspired you in your writing and I’m amazed that anyone ever found that comment of mine buried on Bransford’s high traffic blog. While I have much respect for any writer making it in this tough industry, I couldn’t fathom the Fifty Shades apologist responses. The book was poorly written. I won’t deny it was extremely successful, but to argue it was -not- poorly written was hard for me to understand.

I’m not sure I’m an expert on the subject. I am a writer and I read enough of Fifty Shades to know it was badly executed. I don’t regularly read erotica, however.

But, to answer your questions (may require a bit of editing):

Of course people deserve better. We deserve better books, film, television — all manner of stories which explore sexuality.

Mostly we deserve better quality in literature, especially from traditional publishing houses which continue to claim some sort of supremacy over self-published authors. If they want to maintain the illusion that they are the gatekeepers of that quality, they can’t then snatch up poorly written work and sell it solely based on the titillation factor. If they want to legitimize sexuality in writing, they should find a manuscript that isn’t an absolute train wreck and put their resources behind those authors – they do exist.

Fact remains, however, that erotica is firmly a self-publishing and indie publishing pursuit. As a society, we are much more willing to let mutilation, murder and blood letting of all kinds infiltrate our fiction than we are to allow people to explore their sexuality. Amazon has shown its contempt, along with many distributors, by tightening rules on erotica and at no point did traditional publishers come flying to the rescue. So the “better” stuff is out there if you want to look beyond the high-profile, traditional channels who have only opportunistically grabbed the spotlight of this genre.

I have to recommend the work of fellow critique partner, Jennifer August. I’d recommend any of her books as I’ve critiqued her prose and even learned from her detailed writing and plotting processes. She writes erotica, but at the same time, is concerned about the craft as much as she is the authenticity of the experiences which her characters share. Well-written, well plotted, character-driven smut of the best kind.

9. Cliff Burns, (outspoken) literary pioneer and founder of Black Dog Press:

cliff_burns

YES, men and women deserve better than Fifty Shades of Grey. Because the sexual act, regardless of your orientation, is a ballet, a perfectly breathed and measured poem. It is peerless brush technique and faultless meter and syntax. It reveals the paucity of talent in the Mona Lisa and makes a mockery of the Grand Canyon. It is NOT a tuneless, idiot orchestra, conducted by a tone deaf four year old. It deserves better than Crayola scratchings of sexual congress, stick figure intercourse. Cheap graffiti in a filthy toilet stall. Sexuality is our most fearless and pure expression as human beings. Fifty Shades reduces it to a mere bowel movement.

The hottest sex scene I can think of, at least on paper, is a torrid moment about forty or fifty pages into Terry Southern’s Blue Movie. There are also erotic poems like Yeats’ “Leda & the Swan” and verses of quiet yearning by Sappho. Long, sumptuous passages in D.H. Lawrence’ silly, pornographic “routines” scattered throughout the work of Wm. S. Burroughs. Henry Miller’s up close and personal couplings, genital lice and all. Something for all tastes.

* Cliff Burns’ thread on LibraryThing contains more suggestions for quality sexual literature.

10. Nick Shamhart, public speaker and contributing writer to Esquire and Vibe:

nick_shamhart

(1) On whether men and women deserve better than Fifty Shades of Grey:

Art is of course subjective. Personally I shudder to label a Bodice Ripper as art, but some people consider Robert Mapplethorpe to be an artist. It’s a matter of personal choice — the externalization of the internal.

That said, to tear apart the Fifty Shades trilogy would be unfair. The phenomenon that the books stirred about had little to do with the quality of story telling, the prose, or the presentation. What happened was that the populace brought it upon themselves. Worldwide reading trends are quite sad. Entertainment on demand fired a bullet pointblank into the floundering corpse that was the publishing industry. The statistics for the USA are nothing shy of terrifying. 58% of Americans will not read a book after high school. One in ten thousand Americans is an avid reader, meaning they read more than one book a month.

What happened with the Fifty Shades books was a direct result of those numbers. When people don’t read they have little to use as a basis of comparison. So, instead of E.L. James’ books being swept into the growing heap of erotica, with the likes of Steele, Collins, and other ladies that have been working that trade for decades, people took notice.

Social Media, and its fickle trends helped word spread about the books.

It was the same ecumenical ripple effect that Rowling’s Potter books had. They were fine for what they were, in that case fantasy for Fifty Shades erotica, but for true avid readers that could compare the books to a much broader and larger personal library they were nothing special.

That’s why children like simple, brightly colored toys. They are stimulating, and the child has no previous experience to say whether the toy is good or bad. Most of the staunch supporters of the Fifty Shades book that I have met read very few books annually. Half a dozen at best, so if they have read less than a hundred books in their lifetime. Who is to say what they are basing their love of Fifty Shades against?


The Flag as a National Symbol

singapore_flag

Singapore National Flag

A short reflection on the symbolism of a national flag, on Singapore’s 49th National Day (9 August).

A flag is just a piece of cloth flown from a mast or pole. Yet, every country in the world has its own flag. This is because a flag is a powerful symbol of a country, its people and most importantly of national pride and patriotism. On Singapore’s National Day, let us give some thought to our national flag.

1. The moon in the Singapore flag represents the youthful nation on the rise. The five stars stand for the nation’s ideals: equality, justice, peace, progress and democracy. The red stands for brotherhood (red=the color of blood) and white stands for purity and virtue. The flag symbolizes these high ideals and expectations. We are called to treat our flag with great respect. People who are proud of their country, and what their country stands for, will display their flag conscientiously and with sincere pride.

2. The flag is an expression of people’s national identity and national pride. The flag brings to mind memories of past achievements and gives inspiration towards further success.

3. National symbols are very special to those who share feelings of patriotic pride. Patriotism is to have a cultural attachment to one’s homeland or devotion to one’s country. National pride encourages a country’s citizens to unite as a cohesive people, with a common direction and common sense of purpose for the progress of their country.

With fewer and fewer people motivated to fly the Singapore flag on our National Day, we really have to stop and wonder why.

Happy National Day.

* * *

References / More Information:

About Singapore: National Flag

It’s An Honour (Australia)

Patriotism (Wikipedia)

Time to revive national pride, not revise polls outcome (Malaysian Times)

PAP MPs try to explain why fewer flats flying SG flag (TR Emeritus)

Fewer flats indeed are flying SG flag for NDay (TR Emeritus) (Photographs)

Martyn See: Happy National Day (Facebook)


A Note About…Mystery Man

Some of you may have noticed that I have been considerably slower this year with writing, blogging, and general social media activities.

The reasons are both personal and professional. On the personal level, I got into a challenging (i.e. long distance) yet fulfilling relationship with Mystery Man at the end of 2012. This has had a profound influence on my outlook on life.

Professionally, as an independent publisher, a number of my books in the “erotica” or “erotic fiction” genre have been systematically banned or deleted by retailers because they deem the content obscene or offensive. I have exhausted all avenues to educate them on the differences between porn and quality sexual literature, but to no avail. Nonetheless I will continue to advocate for recognition of this literary genre through my website and blog articles. Stay tuned for an upcoming feature with expert opinions of several (very interesting) guest contributors.

At the same time, I continue to have divergent interests — most notably in my intense interest in both the good and evil aspects of human nature. Thus I am likely to continue working in the psychological thriller genre, and plan out some material in the “contemporary love stories / women’s fiction” genre (I am likely to use a new pen name for this because the tone of the projects will be quite different from my earlier material). On the non-fiction side, there are many more topics I’d like to cover with socio-political blogging, an activity which helps keep my thoughts — and prose — sharp, focused and concise.

I would like to thank everyone who has emailed me / read my work / been following me on social media over the years. I have always liked listening to the personal stories people share as it continually enriches my outlook on life and human relationships. This, along with my own personal experiences, is bound to influence my upcoming projects (as well as those on the back burner).

I will end this post with the wise words of Ralph Waldo Emerson, who defined success in a simple life well lived as:

“To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and affection of children; to learn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; to leave the world a little bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded.”

P.S. The irony (or “poetic justice”) is that I met Mystery Man during a writing event discussing: Sexuality in Literature! I offer my eternal thanks and gratitude to The Arts House for organising the event(s) in the first place…

avatars

Avatars of me and Mystery Man created via Avachara.


NLB: Censorship and Intellectual Freedom

“And Tango Makes Three” is a children’s picture book which features the true story of two male penguins that raised a baby chick in a New York zoo.

Here is my short commentary on the Singapore National Library Board’s (NLB) recent actions to destroy three books (including the aforementioned title) that were deemed unsuitable for young children, because of “non-traditional” family themes.

* * *

penguin-book-ban

Image by Nam Y. Huh/AP

I would like to take this opportunity to direct NLB to the American Library Association’s (ALA) page on censorship and freedom of information.

In a Q&A on these subjects, the ALA states:

“Intellectual Freedom is the right of every individual to both seek and receive information from all points of view without restriction. It provides for free access to all expressions of ideas through which any and all sides of a question, cause or movement may be explored. Intellectual freedom encompasses the freedom to hold, receive and disseminate ideas.”

U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas considered the “restriction of free thought and free speech” to be “the most dangerous of all subversions.”

It does not take great imagination to understand why.

We need look no further than the comments of Young Artist Award recipient, Cyril Wong, who said:

“As a queer writer, I think I have reached a limit of some sort, in the light or dark of recent events. I don’t know why I’m bothering anymore. By sometime next year, I’m just going to stop; yes, stop publishing, stop working with governmental organisations, even stop writing.”

Justifying the removal of books because they “do not reflect existing social norms” provides me with some questions to ponder.

Is a person less of a human being because of their sexual orientation?

Does a perpetually bitter, jealous married wife promote more “family values” than a single mother who dedicates all of her time and energy towards providing the best for her family?

How is a public library serving the needs of the public if members of the public are only allowed to peruse publications that reflect the social norms of only one group or community, at the exclusion of all others?

When people are not allowed to think for themselves or express their views, their voices are effectively silenced. Their self-identity is compromised along with the likelihood of having an authentic dialogue with other human beings.

And it’s too late for society once people don’t have a voice, or are prevented from being heard if they do.

* * *

More Information:

(Singapore Media)

Author Justin Richardson responds to NLB removing his book (The Online Citizen)
Author Jeanie Okimoto responds to NLB removing her book (The Online Citizen)
NLB CEO saddened by protests against gay book pulping (Everything Also Complain)
Ink Spilled on NLB Book Banning (Extensive collection of links by Robin Rheaume / Facebook)

(International Media)

Singapore Provokes Outrage by Pulping Kids’ Books (TIME)
“And Tango Makes Three” appears routinely on the ALA’s annual list of most “challenged” books (Wikipedia)
What Does Singapore Have Against Gay Penguins? (The Washington Post)
Love That Dare Not Squeak Its Name (on homosexual behaviour in animals; New York Times)


The Importance of Preserving Cultural Heritage

I am currently reading The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, which is recognised as one of the essential classics of modern Russian literature.

This led me to think about two of my favourite books of all time — Lolita and Anna Karenina, by Vladimir Nabokov and Leo Tolstoy respectively.

I read these two books when I was in my early twenties (I read the second one while recovering from a massive wisdom teeth operation that I thought I would not survive).

Reading the material made me respect the cultural heritage of Russia — that their citizens produced such profound and renowned works of art/literature earned my everlasting admiration, awe, and respect.

Due to my interest in Russia, I was watching a TV documentary on Moscow a few days ago. While Moscow looks very modern, what struck me in the TV programme was that buildings such as Saint Basil’s Cathedral were still standing tall and proud.

St_Basils_Cathedral

Saint Basil’s Cathedral (1555–61) is a magnificent showcase of Renaissance Russian architecture.

The Moscow Metro itself is a lesson in the nation’s history and architecture. For instance, Soviet art can be viewed at Kievskaya Metro Station, one of the original stations built in the 1930s.

kievskaya-moscow-metro

Kievskaya Metro Station, Moscow

In other words, buildings and sites that are part of the country’s national and cultural heritage were not demolished, but preserved for future generations.

A quick search for the national monuments of various countries comes up with the following results via Google Images:

historic-pagodas-china

1. Sun & Moon Pagodas | Historic Pagodas of China

bhutan

3. Punakha Tshechu | History of Bhutan

Devils_Tower

4. Devils Tower | the first declared US national monument

Malacca

5. Christ Church, Malacca | Malaysia

The Merlion is a well-known icon of Singapore.

sentosa_merlion

The Merlion at Sentosa

What I noticed on this page titled Sentosa: 10 Years Back, was one of the blog comments:

“Really thankful to have found this post too. Very similar sentiments although I’m an 96-er and probably didn’t see as much of Sentosa’s developments as you. But thank you for capturing my childhood memories with this post. I really miss the old Sentosa…”
~ Nostalgia Girl

A few months ago, I remembered coming across a Yahoo article titled 22 Incredible Before and After Pictures that Reveal the Transformation of Singapore.

old_cathay

The Original Cathay Cinema in 1955

new_cathay

New Cathay

While I enjoyed looking at the before-and-after photos, the comments on the article reveal some very real sentiments that were not reflected in the article’s text.

Here are some of the comments:

(1) “Looks like a showcase of how SG decayed over the years. I saw rustic charms and quality workmanship then but now I see prefabs and get rich quick [schemes]. I will pass.” ~ Charles

(2) “Is this another self-praising about how great the PAP is while omitting the lives, assets they robbed from the people. Getting ready for 2016 election? Example: Anson was demolished after losing election and replaced with hotels. Splashing money on renovation every 5 years followed by price hike. Endless upgrades with ZERO value when lease expires.”
~ Wealthy Assets

(3) “I see the quantity of change, but not the quality of betterment.”
~ Andrew

(4) “Now, it is true that, infrastructure wise, Singapore is way better than 50 years ago. However, the ability to save, the cost of living and the social problems facing today, is in dire need of a reform. Compared to the 80s and 90s, [Singapore] is not as charming.”
~ SashaQ

(5) “Singapore’s ONLY transformation is ‘tear and build‘. And the ONLY thing they can build is CONDO and SHOPPING MALLS.”
~ Dante

The following extract describes the importance of “heritage preservation”:

“Heritage Preservation is the protection and enhancement of buildings, sites, districts, structures, objects, and significant natural features that connect a community to its past. . .preserving the community’s heritage fosters civic pride in the beauty and accomplishments of our past. Protection and enhancement of historic buildings and sites is a necessary component of the social and economic prosperity of a community.”
~ City of La Crosse, WI

It is my hope that “economic prosperity” won’t be the only words that current and future leaders of Singapore will take note of, should they happen to read the above paragraph.


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