Moby Dick, Carving & Religion

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mobydick_carving

Moby Dick carving!

There’s a trinket shop not too faraway from here, and I just had to get the whale carving [last piece left / 3rd time that I saw it / hand-made from lilac wood / by a “T. C. Smith” (name scrawled on the back)?].

The following paragraph was/is the opening for my final paper on Moby Dick. For some reason, the edition of the novel I referred to for this course had the ‘dash’ in between Moby Dick, so I included the dash within my essay.

ENG 490: Studies in Major Authors
April 29, 2010

Moby-Dick: Battling the Bonds of Religion

At war with Christian theology and practice, Melville’s literature constitutes “an antireligious domain of subversive indictment against a god who has failed man and whose absence has generated a modern voice of recrimination and alienation” (Franchot, 2008). Moby-Dick is pervasively characterized by Melville’s battle with his religion, Christianity. Inner turmoil, as well as anger and contempt towards the Christian concept of God, is prompted by the impossibility of reconciling the conflict between Christianity and concepts such as religious relativism and homosexuality. Throughout  the story of Moby-Dick, Melville masterfully utilizes the literary elements of tone, characterization, and literary symbolism to reveal to his readers the extent of his inner conflict and contempt with Christianity.

I’ll probably update this post at a later date (or include the whole essay in another post), once my lecturer has finished marking the assignment. I intend to include it in my upcoming Porcelain book too — which has increased to 40,000 words. I think there are 51 poems (over more than 10 years; the more or less “decent” ones). Not really looking forward to linking up each and every poem/story/etc for the eBook versions — but that’s what I would like, if I were purchasing / getting a copy of the eBook, ha ha — so I’ll probably do that once the interior content is finalized (end of June, end of June, end of June).

Anything with poetry is going to be a !@#$ type of experience, to properly format. Porcelain covers short fiction, poems, book excerpts, essays, and a small selection of focused blog posts — basically, my intent with this collection is to:

  1. introduce people to my written work, and,
  2. increase my brand identity’s visibility.

I don’t suppose it’s a secret that I can obsess (with equal fervor) over both the creative and marketing/business aspects of the whole writing/publishing shindig, lol.

Wonder if I’ll spend more time tweaking the interior files of Porcelain for print, or for E. I’ve spent more time tweaking the files for Kindle than print, with my first two books (surprise!) — but now, I’ve finally gotten the paragraphs to stay FIXED, by:

  1. saving as “Web Page Filtered” on Word
  2. testing out on Mobipocket
  3. saving and uploading to Kindle as a .zip.

I’ve also made slight changes to the eBook covers — I think they look better now.

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