Steve Jobs’ Advice

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steve jobs

[Young Steve Jobs | Zillionarts]

I recently came across a very nice post by Kelly at The Maximum Customer Experience blog.

The post was inspired by the following quote:

I’m as proud of what we don’t do as I am of what we do.
— Steve Jobs (BusinessWeek interview)

Here’s what Kelly learned from Mr. Jobs, the iconic leader-guru of Apple Computer:

How to be like Steve? Just Don’t Do It!

Don’t go for the easy short-term dollars over long-term loyalty.

Don’t compromise quality to follow fads.

Don’t complicate your message.

Don’t overthink.

Don’t overdesign.

Don’t underprice.

Don’t make decisions by committee.

Don’t walk forward while looking over your shoulder at the competition.

Don’t pay staff one penny less than your company’s growth is worth to you.

Don’t abandon a fresh idea when you know the customer is ready for it—find a better way to communicate it.

Don’t scream when speaking plainly will do.

Don’t pay for flounces.

Don’t give up.

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5 Oct 2011: RIP Steve Jobs | http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2011/10/jobs/ | “Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.”

Sketches, Drawings

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Some of these are on my Facebook account, and/or “all over the place” — I might draw another female figure next.

* These are sketches from 2003 – 2010. I’ll try to draw more/when I can. It can be tremendously calming (mentally), though it requires a certain amount of intensity/concentration, at the same time.

* For some reason, the pictures are sharper on full view.

poe_sketch

1. Edgar Allan Poe, early 2003 | one of my earliest sketches

girl_hairstyle

2. “Chaz”, early 2003 | model for a high-end hair product ad

ruskin_sketch

3. Ruskin Sketch #1, 2008 | from Ruskin’s “The Elements of Drawing”

broccoli_sketch

4. Ruskin Sketch #2 (broccoli), 2008 | from Ruskin’s “The Elements of Drawing” | I only realised it was a stem of broccoli, when I had finished drawing it. I was under the impression I was drawing a tree -_- (I directly copied the sketch from an image in the book!).

bust_sketch

5. Bust, Sept 2010 | Reference: D. H. Lawrence’s “Women in Love” | ballpoint pen / ~0.5 hrs

tilatequila_sketch

6. Tila Tequila, 2010 | ballpoint pen | Face-wise, not really accurate, body-wise, slightly more so.

* * *

I’d like to continue drawing full figures. In 2003 and 2004 (when I first started drawing), it was always portrait shots only :)

Drawing Confidence

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japanese rock hairstyleJapanese Rock Hairstyle, 2
–> Ballpoint pen — was flipping through a Japanese hairstyle magazine for guys (sooo much better than the one for girls!) | first pic using the ‘cutout’ filter, second pic maybe using ‘dark strokes’ filter on PS

I’ve been a private tutor in the past (very fun) — there were a couple of kiddies I used to teach (who are now 11 years old, if I’m not wrong — WOW, that was fast). I think they were one of the few people I knew who truly enjoyed drawing/illustrating/doodling, in a pure kind of way. They didn’t have a whole guilt and/or negative complex that many adults seem to have when it comes to creating artwork (myself included, for a time).

I remember the first “proper” sketch I attempted, back in 2003 when I was 16+:

elf sketch, legolas
–> Legolas from LOtR | referred to an Orlando Bloom pic.

I drew a lot more when I was 17-18. I remember being quite diligent about it, because:

1) Those years of my life were very dismal and miserable — drawing calmed my nerves down, A LOT.
2) I used to compare drawing to my attempts/experience with writing. I wrote poems + stories throughout my childhood and teenage years — not so with drawing. I always wanted to draw though, I don’t know why.

So I kept drawing, despite people (teachers/lecturers) telling me not to (if they weren’t so boring as facilitators, maybe I wouldn’t have been doodling?)…despite feeling overwhelmed at times by all the crazy artistic talents out there…despite many trial-and-error type drawings that couldn’t be salvaged…

It’s quite strange to look back on, coz through it all, I think the whole process helped me gain confidence in not just drawing, but writing, and myself, and living life itself…it’s quite strange all this could come from “dirtying the paper delicately” (John Ruskin’s fine definition of “drawing”).

Side Note: If you want to buy just one drawing book, make sure it’s John Ruskin’s The Elements of Drawing.

john_ruskin

I think confidence is very important if one wants to do something/anything…confidence to try in the first place, confidence to keep going when it gets tough/sh*tty, confidence to say ‘yes’ even when the whole world is telling you ‘no’ (or the other way around, whichever)…

It’s what allows me to press forward with my next book (and I’d like to do some drawing, if I can slip that in somewhere. I can do those things now because I managed to clear out all the files from my thumbdrives and external hard drive, blahx3, email inboxes too. So everything is really nice and decluttered — just like an uncluttered blog, lol. Just a little bit more packing/cleaning to do with my room — THAT, completed, would be a bonus).

I could write/journal everyday — I don’t know if I’ll ever manage to do one drawing per day (no matter how small / seemingly insignificant). Long ago, I used to think it’d be an impossibility, but right now, it’s a matter of discipline and keeping to a schedule (unless one feels really burned out, in which case some rest would probably be most beneficial).

End Note: There is, however, a difference between confidence and foolishness/arrogance. One is progressive (and not necessarily loud/highly visible/detectable), whereas the other, well, essentially lacks substance. I hope I’ll always know/be aware of the difference.