World’s Highest Paid Minister

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Image Source: Martyn See (Facebook)

Added supporting links below.

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He hangs people. He flogs men.

He imprisons Muslims without trial.

He criminalises gays.

He imprisons a 16-year-old blogger.

He imprisoned an author.

He bankrupted politicians.

He shuts down websites.

He pulps children’s books.

He withholds public funds from opposition wards.

He sues bloggers and journalists, and demands from them the highest costs.

He pays himself the world’s highest salary for a politician.

A very reputable man indeed.

Source: Martyn See (Facebook)

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MARTYN SEE is a Singaporean political blogger and filmmaker with two banned films, two police investigations and a conscience that just won’t let him rest.

Martyn See Online: Blog | Excerpts | Facebook | Photo Album | Interview | YouTube

Did K Shanmugam Make An Illegal Party Political Film? (Martyn See)

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Source: Martyn See (Facebook)

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Did Law Minister K. Shanmugam make an illegal party political film?

Dear K. Shanmugam,

On the 10th of May 2015, you uploaded a video entitled “A Day in the Life of a Minister”, which features a camera crew tracking your activity of the day. It was an unscripted video shot and edited in the style of a reality-TV programme.

You stated that the 12-minute long video was made by “volunteers”. By that, one would assume that this is not a government-sponsored production. As such, may I inform you that this video is not exempted under section 40 of the Films Act and therefore in possible violation of section 33 which criminalises “party political films”, the penalties of which are a fine not exceeding $100,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 2 years.

I cite the following clauses of the Films Act relevant to “A Day in the Life of a Minister”.

“Party political film” means a film —

(a) which is an advertisement made by or on behalf of any political party in Singapore or any body whose objects relate wholly or mainly to politics in Singapore, or any branch of such party or body; or

(b) which is made by any person and directed towards any political end in Singapore;

For the purposes of this Act, a film is directed towards a political end in Singapore if the film —

(a) contains wholly or partly any matter which, in the opinion of the Board, is intended or likely to affect voting in any election or national referendum in Singapore; or

(b) contains wholly or partly references to or comments on any political matter which, in the opinion of the Board, are either partisan or biased; and “political matter” includes but is not limited to any of the following:

(i) an election or a national referendum in Singapore;

(ii) a candidate or group of candidates in an election;

(iii) an issue submitted or otherwise before electors in an election or a national referendum in Singapore;

(iv) the Government or a previous Government or the opposition to the Government or previous Government;

(v) a Member of Parliament;

(vi) a current policy of the Government or an issue of public controversy in Singapore; or

(vii) a political party in Singapore or any body whose objects relate wholly or mainly to politics in Singapore, or any branch of such party or body.

None of the following films shall be regarded for the purposes of this Act as a party political film:

(e) a documentary film without any animation and composed wholly of an accurate account depicting actual events, persons (deceased or otherwise) or situations, but not a film —

(i) wholly or substantially based on unscripted or “reality” type programmes; or

(ii) that depicts those events, persons or situations in a dramatic way;

Exemptions

40. —(1) This Act shall not apply to —

(a) any film sponsored by the Government;

(b) any film, not being an obscene film or a party political film or any feature, commercial, documentary or overseas television serial film, which is made by an individual and is not intended for distribution or public exhibition; and

(c) any film reproduced from local television programmes and is not intended for distribution or public exhibition.

(2) The Minister may, subject to such conditions as he thinks fit, exempt any person or class of persons or any film or class of films from all or any of the provisions of this Act.

(3) An exemption granted under this section may be withdrawn at any time.

I put it to you that the video “A Day in the Life of a Minister” may constitute an illegal ‘party political film’ under section 33 of the Films Act because:

1. It is an advertisement made by or on behalf of a political party in Singapore whose objects relate wholly or mainly to politics in Singapore.

2. It is made by a person and directed towards a political end in Singapore – by featuring a Member of Parliament.

3. It is a film that is substantially based on unscripted and “reality” type programmes, and it also contains dramatic elements.

4. It is not a government-sponsored film.

Of course, the Minister may opt to exercise section 40 of the Films Act to exempt your film from the Act.

In the interest of upholding transparency in the application of the Rule of Law in Singapore, this letter will be made public. I look forward to your reply on this matter.

Yours sincerely,
See Tong Ming

The above was emailed to K. Shanmugam on 11 May.

Source: Martyn See (Facebook)

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MARTYN SEE is a Singaporean political blogger and filmmaker with two banned films, two police investigations and a conscience that just won’t let him rest.

Martyn See Online: Blog | Excerpts | Facebook | Photo Album | Interview | YouTube

Martyn See, Blogger/Filmmaker

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I first surfed into Martyn See’s blog some time ago on a Google search for “LKY Knuckledusters.”

Martyn See is a Singaporean political blogger and filmmaker, who has made films on Dr Chee Soon Juan, Mr Said Zahari and the late Dr Lim Hock Siew.

His blog (online since 2004!) is a great resource in terms of research, quotations, and documentation. I am glad to have seen his name referenced in a couple of non-fiction Singapore books I’ve read. For anyone with an interest in Singapore’s history and current political landscape, do check out his blog and other links at the bottom of this post.

If I had to list some of my favourite posts from Martyn See’s online updates, this blog post might never end. Therefore I have semi-randomly selected a few excerpts and screenshots, which should be of utmost interest to “discerning Singaporeans” (to borrow a description from the scholarly Mr. Yoong).

This list is not exhaustive, as it is meant to serve as a quick introduction to the scope of Martyn’s research.

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POSTS / IMAGES BY MARTYN SEE (political blogger/filmmaker)

1. On LKY: “It is a perhaps a fitting tribute to a man who led his flock by trading emotion for economics, ideals for pragmatism and compassion for politics.”

2. On Davinder Singh: “The aristocrat’s hatchet man is laughing all the way to the bank while shadowed by the ghost of a moral conscience which he aborted and left for dead at youth.”

3. On K Shanmugam potentially making an illegal political party film

4. On LHL: World’s Highest Paid Minister

5. Top 10 Quotes From PAP Chairman Khaw Boon Wan

a) On Your Medisave: “I work hard, I earn more, my medisave is bigger. You’re lazy, you work less, your medisave is small.”

b) On University Degrees: “If they cannot find jobs, what is the point? You own a degree, but so what? That you can’t eat it. If that cannot give you a good life, a good job, it is meaningless.”

c) On The Elderly: “Singaporeans could consider living in nursing homes in Johor Baru. It would be cheaper.”

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6. Tale of Two Teos

On ministers’ pay versus NS men’s pay.

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7. Lee Kuan Yew’s Analects, Part III

Quoted verbatim.

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8. 1994 – 2012: A Chronology of Authoritarian Rule in Singapore

Dec 1994: Novelist Catherine Lim’s column in the Straits Times is suspended after Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong publicly reprimanded her for two articles which suggested that the PAP Government may be out of touch with ground sentiments. “If you land a blow on our jaw, you must expect a counterblow on your solar plexus,” said Goh, who added that Lim must enter the political arena if she wants to continue airing her views. Lim subsequently apologises.

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9. The ISA as a Political Tool

The second installment of a five part excerpt from an Amnesty International report, first published in 1980.

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10. PN Balji, former SPH editor, on growing old in Singapore

“I am hitting 66 and a suffocating and crowded environment are beginning to get to me. There is no hinterland to escape to. Johore, the closest Malaysian state, is a pain to get to because of the exorbitant tolls and massive jams on the Causeway link. . .”

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11. A nation that refuses to heal its wounds

KC Chew, a Harvard graduate imprisoned twice under the ISA for the bogus charge of a Marxist conspiracy in 1987/88, urges the government to seek reconciliation by issuing a national apology for the wrongful arrests and torture of ISA detainees.

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12. Video : Dr Chia Thye Poh

Detained without trial by Lee Kuan Yew’s government for 32 years, Dr Chia Thye Poh was the longest-serving political prisoner of Singapore. This video documents his first public appearance since his release in 1998.

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(Martyn See on the right, with Dr. Chia Thye Poh on the left)

MARTYN SEE is a Singaporean political blogger and filmmaker with two banned films, two police investigations and a conscience that just won’t let him rest.

Martyn See Online: Blog (Best ISA Resource) | Facebook | Photo Album | Interview | YouTube