Author Interview, Jason Pendergrass

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Interview #76, with “serial entrepreneur,” Jason Pendergrass!

Hi Jason! Describe yourself in 5 words:

I am a serial entrepreneur.

Share a short blurb of your work (10-100 words):

business_lessons

This book is a roadmap for business success teaching entrepreneurs how to start and run their own business while not being “Nickel & Dimed” to death. This book teaches such skills as product development, performing effective market research, driving sales using social media, protecting your intellectual property, developing and implementing an effective business strategy, and developing a sales strategy, among many other skills and lessons. This book teaches from my personal experiences with my own businesses. Some lessons came easy and some came the hard way, but this book breaks it down in an easy to understand, simple format.

Share an excerpt of your favorite author’s work (10-100 words):

One of my favorite books, besides my own, is Managing written by Harold Geneen, former CEO of ITT from 1959 to 1977. One of the key quotes form this book is “Performance is reality. Forget everything else.” I completely agree. Performance is the only measure that matters. It will define success and it will define failure. To be successful, you must produce positive results. At the bottom line, that is what matters.

Well-said! Comment on the writing versus publication process, in your experience:

In my experience, writing a book is extremely time-consuming. Just when you think it is perfect, you proofread again and find a chapter you want to expand upon, a grammatical mistake, etc. You also get tunnel vision and that hinders you as well. You’re then forced to clear your head and take a break before continuing on with the quest of writing the book.

As for publishing a book, the only hassle I found was that it was costly. Luckily, my book has been selling successfully, but if the book was not in demand, I could have been stuck with a huge inventory of books I could not sell. There was risk involved. On the other hand, I also sell my book on Screwpulp.com as an e-book, and that eliminates the capital investment needed to publish an actual physical book.

What is your definition of “good writing”?

My definition of good writing is exceeding the readers’ expectations. My book is a business self-help book, so I want to ensure my book helps these entrepreneurs become successful and learn from my experiences while providing an easy to read format. Basically, since my readers are successful because of the lessons taught in this book, Business Lessons of a Rookie Entrepreneur is well written.

Please share your #1 tip for writers:

My number one lesson is to not rush the process. Writing a book is a long journey and everyone wants to finish before their book is perfect. Be patient and remember, quality over speed. You have got to stay focused and keep this lesson in mind. Quality over speed!!

Your websites/blogs/etc:

www.pendergrassbooks.com or message me on Facebook. My book can also be found as an E-book on www.screwpulp.com by searching my name (Jason Pendergrass) or the book title (Business Lessons of a Rookie Entrepreneur).

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Much thanks to Jason for stopping by — do visit Jason’s Website for more info on his projects!

JASON’S SHORT BIO (in his own words):

Started three small businesses, learned a lot, had a mixture of successes and failures. I am here to help you become successful in business.

Website: www.pendergrassbooks.com

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Steve Jobs’ Advice

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steve jobs

[Young Steve Jobs | Zillionarts]

I recently came across a very nice post by Kelly at The Maximum Customer Experience blog.

The post was inspired by the following quote:

I’m as proud of what we don’t do as I am of what we do.
— Steve Jobs (BusinessWeek interview)

Here’s what Kelly learned from Mr. Jobs, the iconic leader-guru of Apple Computer:

How to be like Steve? Just Don’t Do It!

Don’t go for the easy short-term dollars over long-term loyalty.

Don’t compromise quality to follow fads.

Don’t complicate your message.

Don’t overthink.

Don’t overdesign.

Don’t underprice.

Don’t make decisions by committee.

Don’t walk forward while looking over your shoulder at the competition.

Don’t pay staff one penny less than your company’s growth is worth to you.

Don’t abandon a fresh idea when you know the customer is ready for it—find a better way to communicate it.

Don’t scream when speaking plainly will do.

Don’t pay for flounces.

Don’t give up.

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5 Oct 2011: RIP Steve Jobs | http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2011/10/jobs/ | “Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.”